Tag Archives: painting

Summer Art


Summer has been good here at Madison Art.  I’ve not been painting as much as I like, yet the watercolor train is still moving, albeit slowly.  I finished another small painting, which sort of tops off my interest in fruits as a subject to paint.  The newest edition to my collection is “Lunch in the Sun“.

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A small little 9″ x  12″ with a lovely Glasswing butterfly.  These are beautiful creatures native to Central and South America.  And yes they have transparent wings!  It’s a shame they can’t be found around central Illinois.  If you are curious about them check out TwistedSifter for some amazing photos.

I’m ready to move on to other things.  There will always be a special place in my heart for still life paintings, and I’ll probably continue to produce them but it’s time to mix in some figurative work.  I’ve been longing to do this since I did the Pulp Fiction of Oz painting for a friend of mine.  Since then I have has some good conversations with my friend Daniel Vangeli about painting people so I’ve been exchanging some ideas with him.

My wife and I were out to dinner the other night and I was lucky to catch a father and his daughter sitting together waiting for a table.  This beautiful girl was so animated with her dad it was endearing to watch.  I looked over at Jenny and said “You know those two would make a great painting.”  She agreed and I snuck my iPhone up from around my glass of beer and snapped about ten photos of the two.  They turned out great and I am really looking forward to using these as reference for a new painting.  I can’t wait to share it.

Oh yes, I joined the PWS:  Pennsylvania Watercolor Society….

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Busy as a Bee


Well it has been many weeks since I’ve checked in here, so I’m going to cover some ground and get caught up.  Life have been hectic!  Work has been busy and frustrating over the last month or two.  Things at home seem just as busy and in between all of that I manage to squeeze in some art time.  :-\

The Raven painting got shelved… I got so irritated with the center black book that I had to stop before I killed the entire thing.  It’s been sitting facing the wall in timeout at my studio for about as long as I’ve been neglectful of my blog here.  People ask me about it, and I’ve finally got back into the mood to continue work on it.  My time will be split between The Raven and some commission work I’ve started.  I need to dig in and really get some painting done.

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Speaking of art, I was recently invited to speak about my work at the Eaton’s Studio & Gallery http://www.eatonstudiogallery.com/  Herb and his wife Pam have been most generous in giving me the floor during one of their Wednesday Gather at the Gallery meetings.  I enjoyed talking about my art and how things have evolved over the last four to five years for me.  In addition to this opportunity I was able to whip up a few small paintings for the Friends of the Arts 5th Annual fundraiser for the College of Fine Arts at Illinois State University: http://finearts.illinoisstate.edu/support/postcardart.shtml  I donated two small postcard sized watercolors:  ‘Sunglasses‘ and an untitled painting. Both are 4″ x 6″ postcard watercolors.

ImageImageI’ve come to enjoy working smaller, but it is very difficult to develop the details I savor in my larger work.  I have to truncate a lot of the subtle variations in light and color while trying to achieve the effects I love to show.  I was unable to attend the opening so I don’t know who went home with my work, I hope these little paintings find a good frame and a cozy wall or corner to reside in.  I also finished another smaller painting which is the fifth of my fruit series.  I named it “Intermingling”.  I’m pretty satisfied with these smaller pieces but its time to move on to other subjects.  I’ll probably work in more smaller paintings while I hammer away at large works I have to do.

ImageThe first quarter of 2012 has brought me a few festival and exhibition rejections.  This has been the third year I have applied to the Peoria Art Guilds Fine Art Fair. That is $105.00 in application fee’s out the window.  I won’t be applying again, enough is enough.  I don’t know what they are looking for, I wish I did.  I have friends who get into this show year after year.  I have been around long enough to know my craftsmanship and technique is just as strong, my booth shots just as clean and professional looking.   My work should speak for itself…  I didn’t make the Missouri National nor the AWS.  I missed the Transparent Watercolor Societies deadline, so I’ll still keep trying next year.  I think it’s time to send in some portrait type of work instead of the still life subjects I’ve been shopping around the watercolor society shows.  Just ahead is the IWS’s small waters exhibition, the NWS and Watercolor West’s  juried exhibitions.

“Yes John you can apply to all of these shows, you just need to produce some new work!”

Next weekend is the opening of the Illinois Watercolor Societies 28th National Watercolor Exhibition.  My painting “Made in China” was juried in.  I took a little road trip up to The Next Picture Show Gallery in Dixon IL last Sunday to drop it off.  I got a sneak peak of the other paintings and I must say I am pretty impressed.  I have a few favorites I think are going to pull in some awards.  I’ll be in good company for sure.

The SpringBloom Art Festival came and went.  It was in a new venue this year.  It is a small local indoor show I like to attend because it gets me back into the festival mindset.  I re-learn how to put up my erector set of a tent up while I get insights on improving and tweaking my presentation for later shows in the year.  I am thankful for the help my wife Jenny gives me every show.

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Without her and some muscle from Ed and the other kids, setting up and tearing down would be an ordeal.  My festival agenda is spotty at the moment.  I am on a few wait lists and may get moved onto another.  I hope things pan out so I can attend my hometown outdoor festival and perhaps the 4th Street Festival in Bloomington Indiana.  I was close to the wait list in Columbus this year but I’m getting short on time and unless they call soon, I won’t make it there in June.  Time will tell.

By next post, I hope to have finished a new large commission and have resolved the challenges with The Raven.  More to come!

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Moving Targets


We are well into 2012 already and I’ve had to shift gears and make some adjustments art wise.  The first batch of show applications went out and came back with nothing to report other than try again next year.  I just don’t think still life holds much value to jurors in comparison to other subjects.  I’m going to give ‘Made in China‘ one more shot at the IWS National, which I have to submit to today.  After that I think I’m going to shelf the idea of entering my still life work into national competitions.  In order to counterbalance this I have begun to focus more on commissions that I’ve needed to get started on.

Locally I seem to be getting more traction with my art.  I was invited to speak at another artists’ gallery and show some of my work there.  The city of Normal has a new large construction going up and they have invited local artists to submit work for the building.  I put in three pieces for my submission and hopefully something will come of that.

Speaking of submissions, my son Ed has some art talent and entered a local amateur art show through his high school art class and was juried in.  The show opens today with the awards ceremony at the McLean County Art Center.  I remember several years ago applying to this show myself.  I’m looking forward to going today and it makes me proud to see my son get into his first show.  Maybe he will continue with art and get many years of enjoyment from it.  I’ll have some photos of this for my next post.

Where the pigment meets the paper has been frustrating me lately.  I started this full sheet painting of another still life focused on an Edgar Alan Poe theme of books, glass a skull and a yes a raven.

I drew some inspiration from the 16th and 17th century Vanitas styled European paintings.  I’ve ran into some technical challenges and ended up scrubbing and lifting out a book that turned out pretty awful after the first attempt.  The problem I’ve had is the golden/yellow light hitting the black spine of the book.  There are several swiftly graded value transitions that I just over worked trying to get the look right.  The book lettering didn’t turn out well either so I ended up taping it off and sponge scrubbing the paint up.  The paper is slightly eroded but workable.  I decided to just simplify the book and make it entirely black without lettering.  Mentally I’ve checked out of this painting and I decided to pull it off the table and start other work.  I sat stagnant staring at it for hours and hours wondering if I should just start over, or not.  For now I’m done with it but I do plan on getting back to it at some point.  It is perhaps one of the more difficult paintings I’ve attempted.  The subject matter of this painting has a wide variety of surfaces, textures, patterns and shapes to deal with collectively and I may have bit off more than I could chew.

Time will tell, for now, it’s on to a surreal landscape commission.

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Past Present & Future


Fourteen blog posts in 2011. Not bad I guess, but not good either:

New Resolutions:  1/5/2011
First Salvos:  1/20/2011
Losing Momentum:  3/1/2011
The Good the Bad & The Disappointments:  3/31/2011
Paying to Play:  4/15/2011
Small Watercolors, Small Steps:  4/18/2011
A Little Art Exhibit:  5/3/2011
Reading the Signs:  5/25/2011
Picking up the Pieces:  6/11/2011
Art that is Personal:  6/29/2011
A Short Break:  8/12/2011
Making Time:  8/26/2011
Art Galleries are they worth it?  10/19/2011.

I just skimmed over everything I wrote from 2011.  Looking back I have to say it was a tough and expensive art year for me.  My festivals were hit and miss, mainly miss.  The exhibitions, contests and shows I applied to were mostly filled with rejections.  I managed to complete twelve original paintings of which seven sold.  I made it into the TWSA National and won a Juror’s Choice award at the McLean County Art Center’s first local watercolor exhibition.  I even found an artist roommate to share the studio space with which has helped on costs.

Towards the tale end of 2011, I started teaching watercolor classes at the McLean County Art Center and also began individual lessons at my art studio.  I have always thrived on learning from other artists and it has been nice to give back and teach others what I know about painting.  It sort of feels like I’ve come full circle in some respects.  I’m still clawing for success and validation with my work but whether that manifests itself now, later or never doesn’t really matter.  It is the journey that is important right?

What will this year bring?  An end to the Mayan calendar for sure!  Other than that, probably more of the same, but maybe there will be a show or two I get into this time, or an exhibition I’ve been hoping for.  Maybe I will be able to paint thirteen paintings this year and post more on this blog without letting almost ninety days go by without a word.

I want to thank those of you who I have interacted with over the last year.  To my seven followers, you have my sincere thanks.  I will always look up to Crystal Cook’s Blog for inspiration, she rocks the blog scene and does a great job of conveying the good artists message.  Dan Vangeli, you’re the man and we are overdue for a phone call.  May your 2012 be even sweeter than 2011 was for you.  Many thanks to two of my mainstay supporters, Mr. Jackson and Mr. Stoeckley.  You both have been great sounding boards for me over the years and I appreciate it.  I also want to shout out to Doug at the MCAC, thanks for doing what you do and looking out for me this last year.  I want to express my gratitude to Natalie and Bekah at The Pod for entertaining my son on his weekly visits and for selling my art!  Last but surely not least, I want to thank my family for putting up with the trials, tribulations and moments of success I’ve experienced and shared since this all started.

Ok, let’s roll.

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Art Galleries, are they worth it?


If my blog was one of my kids, it would have died from neglect.  I can’t count the days that I had passing thoughts about writing something insightful or interesting but the moments passed and I guess I just got caught up in the day.  Days fade into weeks, weeks into months and before you know it your online journal is old and dusty.  It is not just being busy that keeps me away from blogging as much as one ‘ought’ to.  The fact is, at times, I don’t think anything I may write is worth reading.  I guess it’s better to say nothing than to just vomit out posts on the basis of being regular.

Regardless I’ll press on from where we left off at the tail end of August,  galleries.  I really don’t have much experience as an artist interacting with the art gallery scene.  Initially I thought galleries to be a waste of commission money, but I have come to learn that a gallery can be worth the money.  Promoting yourself as an artist requires many different hats, all of which require time to wear.  Most painters I know just want to paint and we all wish the rest would just fall into place, but it doesn’t.  To be successful as an artist, you have to be a marketing manager, a publicist, a web designer, blogger, a tax adviser, business manager as well as the crafter.  Good galleries can wear a few of these hats for you.

Galleries and artists have to possess a symbiotic relationship in order for both to be successful.  I  have found such a gallery, The PodIt is co-owned by artists Bekah Berry and Natalie Wetzel.   The Pod opened last July during our local fine art festival which I was showing in.  As it was a good show for me, I know the The Pod did very well and business was booming those first two days.  Since then, I have established an art presence there and become friends with Bekah, Natalie and their great families.  I have even learned a bit more about what a good gallery can do for an artist.  Hold that thought, I’ll get back to this in a minute.

If you are an artist, ask yourself this:  How do I get my art out there to sell?  Online? Festivals? Contests and exhibitions?  If you have read my blog enough, you will know that festivals are the most labor intensive and risky.  The costs an artist bears is considerable and the ROI is as unpredictable as the weather.  How much online sales have you garnered assuming your website/presence is even capable of e-commerce?  Art exhibitions can also be expensive and usually require original work only.  You have to give up a piece for the duration of a show.  Often the exhibitions will take a little cut of your proceeds if your piece sells.  You have to pay to apply, pay to ship and you wait.  Sales during these events are uncommon if not rare and the competition is tough, so having expectations to take home some prize money is a foolish notion.

Exhibitions are a great way to get exposure.  Often they are covered in national circulated magazines and can draw the attention of galleries, collectors and customers.  They are also a great way to meet and greet other artists, patrons and society organizers.  Most nationally ranked shows such as the AWS, NWS & the TWSA are located in very busy venues that get lots of traffic.  Some even have traveling exhibitions where the show is displayed in several large cities around the country.

Now back to the gallery.  Some offer a co-op where you pay for wall space or rent and keep 100% of your proceeds if something sells.  Others take a commission and still some do a combination of both.  Over the long haul I find the renter type of gallery to be cost prohibitive and in some sense counterproductive.  Think about it, a gallery that is a wall rental operation only has to worry about getting the rent check.  They don’t have to know you, your art,  or even really value your craftsmanship.  Their first concern is paying their rent from the rent checks they collect from the artists.  There is less motivation to sell and often the more art this type of gallery can cram in, the better.  I like to call it wall sprawl.  You will know it when you see it.   Art starts inches from the floor and will go inches to the ceiling, around corners and in places that are not really idea for display.  Pushing maximum density comes to mind!

Combination galleries who charge wall rent and also take a commission tend to be even more costly to the artist.  Often the rent and commission fees are cheaper but together they often surpass the other two types of galleries.  If your art sits in a rental gallery for too long, you are more or less giving it away or losing money.  This forces artists to either up their prices to compensate or bring in larger expensive pieces that can afford to depreciate over rental time and still make the artist some money on the back end of a sale.  Given the economy, who wants to add yet another monthly expense?

When I first considered galleries as an option, my first thoughts were, “50%…. really?  The hell with that.”  Then I got myself going with festivals, and found that not only was I putting in travel expenses and the time and costs of showing at a festival, it was hard work and often unrewarding.  Rinse and repeat this process and soon, 50% seems more appealing.  I don’t have to setup a tent, sit in blazing heat for 12-20 hours and hope sales are enough to warrant the effort.  There is far less risk in damaging my art in transit and I don’t have to worry about inclement weather, setup and tear down difficulties, hotels and all the other intangibles that spring up during a festival.

Alternatively I can walk my paintings down to The Pod gallery, and have them nicely displayed in a place that has far more foot traffic than my studio at a cost I can afford.  The best thing is, Natalie and Bekah are honest, friendly and very energetic about my work.  It’s an honor to be included in their repertoire of artists and I know they have my best interests in mind.  Their rates are very fair and they are flexible enough to allow me to call the shots on what art I hang there and for how long.  I’d go as far to say that they have bent over backwards to accommodate me.

I’m fortunate to have such a gallery just a block from where I paint.  Not all artists are so lucky.  The important thing to remember is what works well for me may not for you.  You may find the festival circuit far more appealing, or the rental gallery option.  Just be sure you cover all your bases before you risk your original art to the hands of strangers.  The risks need to be shared, and if you feel your being steered into a deal that puts everything on you, then just say no.  There are always greener pastures to find, just keep looking.

The Collector hanging in The Pod Gallery: Uptown Normal IL.

Made in China hanging in The Pod Gallery: Uptown Normal IL.

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Making Time


I don’t often take the time I should to just do nothing.  Life these days always seems busy and I feel that I lose touch with the things that I enjoy a lot.  Obviously painting is one, but I often find myself longing for the outdoors and nature.  Right now I’m sitting out back on my patio… it’s dark out, and there’s a refreshing cool wind blowing from the north.  Considering it is still 83F out at 10:00 PM, the breeze is nice.  There is a choir of crickets and every other nocturnal bug singing in unison as if under the sway of some conductors baton.    Stars twinkle overhead between passing clouds and the world around me prepares for sleep.  Some soft music is playing while my faithful companion, Sam lounges just out of arms reach watching over me and the yard while I tend to this blog.  Topping this off is a fresh glass of red merlot.  One could argue it doesn’t get much better than that, and frankly I can’t see much in the way of disagreeing.  I can only ask myself, why aren’t you out here more than once or twice a month?  The answer is time.

Sam

Just as much as I would like to sit out after a long day and soak up the evening I don’t.  Our family is very busy.  Our house in a total disarray due to some remodeling, and Jenny and I are blessed with three active kids.  It seems like the choir list and  running never stops.  Perhaps I will miss these days, when the nest is empty and I have only time on my hands.  I miss my art too, much akin to the feeling of being constantly late for something.  I’ve not been in my studio doing any new watercolor painting for almost two months.

The last piece I completed: “Made in China” a 22″ x 32″ watercolor, was the last and largest of a triptych of still life paintings which have done rather well for me.  The first painting: “Firestorm” won the Juror’s choice award at the McLean County Art Center’s first watercolor exhibition back in July.  This painting, along with the sister piece; “Facet“, sold rather quickly.  The last of the trio will go to the Lincoln Art and Balloon Festival tomorrow.

 

Firestorm

Made in China

Facet

Art festivals four weekends in a row don’t give you much time for anything, especially with a full time day job.  My short festival circuit has felt like a crap shoot.  So far only one show has been profitable and worth the time, expense and effort of setting up and operating in the summer heat for two days.  The rest have been break even endeavors, plagued by bad weather, poor attendance and little to no sales.   It really digs at an artists’ self esteem and makes one feel like they are just walking in circles.

Walking in Circles

For me there has been no way to predict sales, set any type of goals or have any expectations.  Doing so only results in disappointment.  Working at McDonald’s has more stability than trying to sell art in this economy, and even at minimum wage, is more profitable.  This begs the question whether festivals are even worth the time and effort.  What is the alternative?  Galleries? Ebay? Book Covers? If you have any ideas do tell.  I’ve often thought about doing book covers, but how do you get a foot in that door?  I’ve always thought about showing in galleries, and have had some recent offers.  One comes from a downtown San Francisco establishment called the The Galiara and the other; The Pod,  The latter is just down the street from my art studio.  And on that note I’ll see you all on the next post, where I will be discussing my short experiences with The Pod and my hopes for a presence at the Galiara on the west coast.

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A short break


Just a little note here, I don’t have time to elaborate like I would prefer, but rest assured I am still here and kicking. I’ve been meaning to write… really I have. There has been a lot of good things happening for me but I have been awfully busy.

I will be showing every weekend this month (August) at three fine art festivals around central Illinois. Tomorrow I’ll be at the Washington Fine Art Festival: http://www.washingtonfinearts.org/ The weekend after on the 20th I will be showing at the Champaign Downtown Festival of the Arts: http://www.champaignparkdistrict.com/events/dtfoa/index.html The weekend after I’ll be returning to Lincoln Illinois for the Fine Art and Balloon Festival on the 27th and 28th: http://www.lincolnillinois.com/ABF.aspx

Company is always welcome, so if you’re itching to see some good art I encourage you to make a day trip to one of these shows.

Cheers

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Art that is Personal


Conveying something personal in my art has been one of the most challenging parts of painting.  I’ve learned, albeit slowly,  that mechanics and craft aren’t everything.  Connecting your creations to the viewer is another skill altogether.  I think the artists at the top of heap are masters of both mechanic and the transcendent.  Art has as many meanings to people as there are opinions in this world, however there are some things that I think are universal.

People want a narrative, a story or something they can relate to.   That is why music, movies and books are constants in entertainment.  Before there were words, or instruments there were pictures.  The pictures that have a narrative to them as well as fine craftsmanship and uniqueness become timeless.  Leonardo’s Mona Lisa, Michelangelo’s David or his work in The Sistine Chapel are fine examples of a narrative that transcends the artist and becomes something greater.

I’m going to tangent here, but I hope in the end all this will tie together.  I’ve been writing down ideas I get for future paintings.  Right now the list is up to fifteen, and will probably grow.  I’ve found this helps a great deal when I am sitting down debating what to start next.  There is a trend developing in the list and that contains the human element.  If you go back to my previous blog post about Learning from Artist Magazines, I mentioned that the largest chunk of award wining paintings were portraits.  My list has six ideas that incorporate the figure or portrait in some fashion.  The last entry on the list was about this lucid dream I had the other day:

It was a bright summer day and I was lounging in a park near a small stream.  The grass was a lush green and the sun was bright that afternoon.  There were trees and birds and bugs flying about their business.  I think I was with someone but I don’t recall because I never saw them, but I was as I am now.

Ahead maybe a half a blocks distance, just down stream, was a young couple walking with their small boy.   He must have been five or six tops.  The trio glowed in the summer sun and were happy.  As they drew near I recognized them to be my parents but they were young and vibrant and smiling.  It felt so real and I just watched them walking.  The little boy broke out ahead of them towards me, a bit wobbly in his step.  He wore what I thought was a little boy scouts outfit, with the bandana around the neck and a tan shirt but there were no patches or anything.  Khaki shorts and brown sandals hugged his chubby legs and feet and he had the most curious look.  He stepped right up to my feet, and smiled.

I lay there looking at myself as a child.  It was surreal.  I glanced back up to my mom, who could not have been a day older than thirty.  She gave me a short motherly stare; as if she was reading my mind, and smiled, knowing somehow, without a word spoken between us, that little Johnny would remain innocent of the situation.  I smiled and cast my gaze back upon the boy in front of me.  He said to me, “My name is John.. as he smiled revealing a missing front tooth.  I replied, “That’s my name too”.  We talked for a few minutes, and there was a desire for me to tell him some words of wisdom about us, but in the end I could not bring myself to spoil it.  Moments later the trio: my Mom, Dad and me said goodbye and walked away just as they had come.  The scene passed…  I woke up.  I remembered this with such clarity.  It was one of the most unique dreams I’ve ever had, and I really wish I could go back to it.

This will be my first self-portrait attempt in watercolor.  This scene… It’s perfect in every way and I can’t begin to describe the feeling I had inside the dream, and just thinking about it brings a range of emotions and thoughts about my life or what could have been had dreams become reality.

I’m not a portrait painter yet.  I’m a still life painter for the most part.  Just as I desired to do complex still life work when I first started, I quickly realized that I had to learn to walk with watercolor before I could run.  Some subjects were beyond my ability.  I very much want to jump feet first into this self portrait, but I need some time to hone the art of portraits to a level that my still life work presently resides.  Anything less and I will be disappointed.

Ultimately, I want to incorporate more into my still life work and begin to paint people.  I see surrealism around the corner, and by the time I work through my list of fifteen, I think my art will begin to speak to a wider audience.  Maybe one of my paintings, will transcend my time here and speak to future generations in a way my earlier work was unable to do.  Time will tell.

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Picking up the Pieces


The Columbus Art Festival http://columbusartsfestival.org/ came and went.  The best part of the trip was the fact that I spent some great quality time with my son Ed.  He was a great help during the show, and it makes me proud to be his dad.  I received many great compliments about him, so I think Jen and I did something right in raising him.  I forgot to take some photos of him and I together.  Next time I’ll remember to do that!

           

I walked the show a few times and was overwhelmed with quality art everywhere.  There were some amazing glass sculptures, awesome photography, wood crafters, mixed media illustrators and of course traditional painters.  Best of all, Leah Alters was a gracious host and show director.  She was helpful, personal and went out of her way to make sure my needs were met while attending.

During my days exhibiting at the festival, I was particularly impressed with some stand out artists.  I’m not going to plug them too much but I’m going to list them here so that you can also enjoy their work.  First and foremost in the list was my booth neighbor, Daphne Covington  http://www.daphnecovington.com   She does wonderful abstract oil paintings and was a hoot to hang out with all weekend.  I hope we can be booth neighbors again someday.  If it wasn’t for her and Ed, I would have lost a lot of art or worse when the deluge hit Saturday night.  Before I get to the other artists, I want to talk about tent weights.

Good tent weights are like good insurance, you will wish you had them when it’s too late.  Last year I reluctantly spent the money on a set of Happy Feet weights:  http://happifeet.com/  They’re not cheap, but they look great and are by far; hands down, the best tent weights money can buy.  Made by artist Cindy Gordon, for artists, they kept my tent on the ground against some very severe wind gusts somewhere around 50-60 mph.

Also if you are thinking about exhibiting, be sure you’re insured as well.  There were some artists who lost everything at the Columbus show.  Have a backup plan if your willing to risk your heart and souls work on the randomness of weather.

Ok back to the artists I wanted to mention.

            Robert Flowers –  http://www.robertflowersart.com

            Geoffrey Harris – http://geoffreyaaronharris.com

            James Petran – http://www.artsiowacity.org/artist/jpetran/jpetran.htm

            Phillip Nolley – http://phillipnolley.com/

All of them do fantastic work, and I enjoyed talking art shop with each of them.  I plan on beginning my personal collection with work from each of these artists.  I did buy a few small glass pieces from Nolley that I will be incorporating into a few new paintings.  Hopefully him and I can continue to work together to bring his 3D glass into my 2D watercolors.  I hope to get some transparent marbles from him soon.  :-]

Columbus also showed me what superior booth presentations look like.  I saw some very amazing looking setups and you can tell what people have been doing this for a while.  Good festival tents look uniform, neat, and are very inviting to look at.  I’ve picked up a few ideas to continue to improve my setup.  I think every show will be better as far as presentation goes.  Sales continue to be the low points in the shows I attend.  The bad economy isn’t helping anything either.  I have four shows left, maybe a fifth if I get into the Bloomington Indiana festival and that will end the season for me.  I feel like I’m pulling a boat anchor up hill sometimes.

It’s hard to keep doing things when the effort has no payoff.  The next four shows need to put me in the black or I’m going to re-examine and re-prioritize for 2012.  The festival venue may just get shelved.  There is still hope though.  I’ve been contacted by The Galiara in San Francisco http://www.galiara.com/   They are interested in showing my art there, so I’m pretty excited about that.  I have plans to send them a good body of work in the early autumn and keep it there or a rotating stock if they will allow.

More on this later.

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Reading The Signs


Tracking your own growth and success is perhaps one of the most difficult tasks one can undertake in self-assessment.  If you’re not on a rocket ship to the top of the art world, it can be difficult  to read the signs of success.  Getting outside your own art box can help.

Generally speaking, I tend to underrate my art by being over critical of myself.  By doing this I also tend to diminish others perceptions of my art and me.  Taking compliments used to be as difficult as criticism.  “They are just being nice…” I would say to myself.  Hell I do that, everyone does.  For example, when your girlfriend or wife asks you if they look good wearing the jeans she has on.  A wise man will smile and say “Yes”.  Pause even a moment and you have failed.  Overdo it and become a zealous yes man and you have failed again.

Image from www.tonedeafcomics.com & John BogenschultzDespite the social politeness and courtesies we extend to one another, it has a tendency to fog the lenses a bit, especially when it comes to art.

Lets rewind a little.  2006: I’m 37 and I’m sitting in a evening watercolor class at Heartland Community College.  Nineteen years had passed since I held a paintbrush that wasn’t intended for a wall.  I was the oldest student in the room, I wasn’t sure about much of anything as far as art went.  Was it like riding a bike?  I’d find out in a hurry with another dozen peers to compare to.  Sign number one:  My end of the semester watercolor painting won the best of show at the student art show.  Big deal right?  Not really.  I chalked it up as good luck.  The story goes on… Acceptance into a bachelor’s program three months later, then into a masters program at a fairly prestigious art school twelve months from the day I started at Heartland.  Then comes the first year of art festivals.  Four shows and two originals sold and a best of show to boot.  Yes there were some Dear John’s along the way but considering I was a festival virgin, things went well.

Moving forward to my last blog post two week ago.  I dropped a few names in that post.  It was a huge surprise when I received a thank you email from one of the artists I mentioned.  Small world it seems.  How on earth did he find my blog?  I guess it was the magic of Google.  That means people do read it, and care enough to write – Thanks Dan! –  http://www.danielvangeli.com/

So my blog is sputtering forward, I’ve been juried into more shows this year, as well as a local Watercolor exhibition hosted by the McLean County Arts Center  http://www.mcaart.org/mcac/html/index.html  Commissions are trickling in, and I’m getting some foot traffic at the studio as well as a sale or two.  Which reminds me that I need to be painting instead of typing.

So if you are reading this and are wondering to yourself  how you are doing as an artist take a bit to reflect on where you were a few years ago and where are you today.  What are the signs telling you?  My signs are telling me that my ship has sailed, and made it out of the bay, ahead is a vast ocean waiting.  Hopefully I’ll be heading into calm waters and red skies.

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